Phillip Frederick Edward Schuler

Portrait of Phillip Frederick Edward Schuler

Rank

War photographer and correspondent

Roll title

Attached to 1st Division Headquarters

Convoy ship

HMAT Orvieto

Schuler in the uniform of an officer of the Australian Intelligence Corps in 1911.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial A05158

Phillip Frederick Edward Schuler was born in East Melbourne in 1889, the son of Gottlieb Frederick, a German migrant, and Sarah.

As part of his compulsory military service, Schuler served in the militia in the 5th Battalion. In February 1911 he transferred to the Australian Intelligence Corps as a second lieutenant, being assigned to the Australian Service Corps a year later.

Schuler was a junior reporter at The Age in Melbourne, while his father was editor. In this role, he volunteered to be the paper’s correspondent attached to the AIF, responsible for photographing, documenting and reporting on the campaigns. 

Schuler was 26 years old when he left with the First Convoy to travel to Egypt and Gallipoli.

Reverend Edwin Bean, Charles Bean's father; Charles Bean, the official war correspondent; Archie Whyte, editor of the Melbourne Age and Phillip Schuler. The photograph was probably taken before Schuler and Bean's embarkation at Melbourne in October 1914.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial, A05379

HMAT Orvieto leaving Port Melbourne. The crowd watching the ship depart had rushed the pier. The photograph was taken by Charles Bean.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial G01539

Schuler embarked from Melbourne on 21 October 1914 on board HMAT Orvieto, the flagship of the First Convoy. After a five-day passage, Orvieto arrived in King George Sound, Albany, on 26 October.

It was on board Orvieto that Schuler met and befriended Charles Bean, the official war correspondent.

The Orvieto reached Suez on 1 December 1914 and passed through the canal. It docked at Alexandria on the morning of 3 December and disembarked troops. 

After disembarking in Egypt, Schuler reported on the preparations being undertaken by the AIF and stayed at Mena Camp, outside Cairo. On New Year’s Day 1915 Schuler and Bean climbed one of the pyramids.

Schuler took this photograph of a First Convoy transport unloading at Alexandria, Egypt.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial PS0375

Schuler and Chaplain Walter Dexter stand outside a tent at Mena Camp in Egypt.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial J04104

Bean and Schuler (both behind the stand) take notes on Sir George Reid’s speech to the troops at Mena Camp in December 1914. Reid, a former Australian prime minister, was the High Commissioner for Australia in England.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial G01603

Members of the Australian Light Horse in Cairo

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial PS0463

Schuler atop one of the pyramids on New Year’s Day, 1915, photographed by Charles Bean.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial, G01651

Schuler watches the movement of allied ships in Mudros Harbour from Mount Elias on Lemnos

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial PS1954

As the Australian official correspondent, Bean was able to secure a place at the Gallipoli landing of 25 April 1915. The unofficial correspondents were excluded, but Schuler pleaded with General Sir Ian Hamilton, the expeditionary force’s commander-in-chief, to be allowed to go ashore. With permission finally granted, he arrived on the peninsula in late July, in time to cover the August offensive. 

Schuler stayed in Bean’s dug-out at Maclagan’s Ridge and nursed him after he was wounded at the battle of Sari Bair. 

Schuler returned to Australia in early 1916. While there, he wrote two books based on his experiences of the campaign, Australia in Arms and The Battlefields of Anzac, which were both published that year.

But he felt he needed to do more. He enlisted with the AIF in Melbourne on 7 April 1916, joining the Headquarters Corps 3rd Divisional Train as a driver. 

Phillip Schuler’s image of Anzac Cove from the sea.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial PS1472

A view of Brown’s Dip on Gallipoli, taken by Schuler

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial PS1509

Schuler outside a dug-out at No. 2 Post on Gallipoli in 1915. Oars and boat timbers from an abandoned lifeboat have been used to prop up the entrance.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial G00983

A view of Plugges' Plateau and Maclagan's Ridge, where Schuler nursed his friend Bean after he has been wounded.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial H16712

Schuler, probably at his family home in Melbourne, before leaving for overseas service.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P07692.001

Schuler left with the First Convoy as a press correspondent in 1914. After his return to Australia in 1916, he officially enlisted in the AIF on 7 April. These attestation papers record that enlistment.

Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: B2455, SCHULER P F E, pp1-3

The area around Messines was the scene of heavy fighting on 7 June 1917.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial E01288

Within a month Schuler had been promoted to lance corporal. He embarked from Melbourne on HMAT Persic, arriving at Plymouth, England, on 25 July. He remained in Britain until he was transferred to France in November.

He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in February 1917 and was posted to 869 Company, while the 3rd Divisional Train, Australian Army Service Corps was at La Crèche. A short time later, his company was transferred to Le Kirlem, and then Nieppe, where he was to be the supply officer for 868 Company. On 24 May he was promoted to lieutenant.

Schuler’s company was responsible for supplying the units fighting at Messines Ridge with barrage rations and pack transport. 

Captured German trenches at Messines Ridge, Belgium, June 1917.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial H08723

The area around Messines was the scene of heavy fighting on 7 June 1917.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial E01288

On 23 June 1917, Schuler was seriously wounded by a shell burst at Messines, Belgium. Later that day, he succumbed to his wounds. His service record states that he died of gunshot wounds to his left arm, face, throat and right leg.

 

Schuler is buried at the Trois Arbres Cemetery, Steenwerck, in French Flanders.  In an obituary, Bean described his friend as, ‘[a] brilliantly handsome, bright, attractive, [and] generous youngster’.

Phillip Schuler is buried in Trois Arbres Cemetery (Plot 1, Row S, Grave 43) in Steenwerck, Belgium.

Courtesy of the War Grave Photographic Project

DENISE & BINDI

Thank you for our freedom.

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Anonymous

As a fellow journalist in the safe times that men such as Phillip helped secure, I offer heartfelt thanks for all that he endured, ultimately his full of potential life.

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Colin

Good on you, Philip. May you rest in peace for ever more. NO MORE WAR, please.

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anonymous no# 2

You were a good person.

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Anonymous

Thank you.

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Anonymous

Thank you for making Australia safe. We all appreciate you. R.I.P -  thank you once again.

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paul

RIP.

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george

What a brave man you were. Rest in peace, never to be forgotten.

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Anonymous

Thank you.

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Anonymous

I think you did a great job in the war and I just want to say thank you.

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MICHAEL CHIGUMBU

THANK YOU for fighting for all the Aussies.

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Anonymous

THANK~YOU.

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TINA

Thank you for volunteering, telling your story and your courage. Lest we forget.

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Anonymous

Thank you for your service in the army. For your unnerving courage fighting. LEST WE FORGET.

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BRIAN

SO BRAVE, SO SAD. RIP.

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Anonymous

I am sad you did not survive.

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Anonymous

Thank you for your service.

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Anonymous

God bless you.

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maggie

Thank you.

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jay davey

I am thankful for your help.

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cooper jeans

You are very brave and thank you for fighting for our country.

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zoe

I hope you are well.

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Natasha Davidson

I'm sorry that you didn't make it, Australia is now a place of peace. Sorry you couldn't see it that way because I'm sure you wanted to.

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Anonymous

Thanks for your selfless service.

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amity phillips.

Thank you for fighting for us.

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Anonymous

Thank you.

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Anonymous

Thank you for fighting for us.

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Anonymous

Thank you.

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Anonymous

Thank you for all the great work you did. Thank you.

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taj

He died fighting for his country. And telling the world the truth.

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taj

Thank you for helping our country.

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steph

I thank you for being brave and getting footage of the war. Amen.

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mia

Lest we forget.

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Anonymous

THANK YOU.

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zoe

Thank you for your tributes and your photography of the war. It helps us understand the war-time.

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Anonymous

We thank you for your tributes to our country and thank you for risking your life for a better future.

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Anonymous

LEST WE FORGET.

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christina vassta

Tully, Qld.

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Anonymous

To those who made the ultimate sacrifice - thank you.

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Anonymous

RIP.

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hamish

Thanks for your service.  HAMISH THOMSON.

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Anonymous

RIP, YOU DID WELL.

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Annabelle

Thank you for your service and bravery. Annabelle.

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annabelle

Thanks for going to war. I hope war never comes back. Annabelle.

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Annabelle

THANKS A LOT.

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Anonymous

Thank you for your courageous service.

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Annabelle

Thank you for your contribution you made, from Annabelle.

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Anonymous

Hi, My name is Annabelle. Thank you for going to war. I have freedom thanks to you. You saved me. Thank you so much, Love Annabelle.

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Olivia

Thank you for serving and taking some memorable pictures.

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Anonymous

You were such a great man. You took some amazing photos and should be recognised more.

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